NTNU

Computer Science Graduate Student Conference 2002

(CSGSC-2002)

Trondheim, May 6th, 2002

 

Program

 

9:00 

Keynote #1: Jan Komorowski

 

 

10:00 

Coffee Break

 

 

 

Session 1

Chair: Amund Tveit

10:20

Pavel Petrovic

Evolving a Distributed Arbitration for a Behavior-Based Mobile Robot Controller

10:45

Ekaterina Prasolova-Førland,

Monica Divitini

Supporting learning communities with collaborative virtual environments: Different spatial metaphors

11:10

Håvard D. Jørgensen,

John Krogstie,

Oddrun P. Ohren

The Future of CSCW: Scientific Maturity at the Expense of Interdisciplinarity?

11:35

Inger Dybdahl Sørby,

Line Melby,

Øystein Nytrø

Characterizing Cooperation In The Ward: A Framework For Producing Requirements To Mobile Electronic Healthcare Records

 

 

12:00

Lunch

 

 

 

Session 2

Chair: Xiaomeng Su

13:00

Gunnar Tufte

Evolution of Digital Circuits using Development on a S block Platform

13:25

Jinghai Rao

Using Program Synthesis to Facilitate Web Services Composition

13:50

Carl-Fredrik Sorensen,

Alf Inge Wang,

Hien Nam Le,

Heri Ramampiaro,

Mads Nygard, 

Reidar Conradi

The MOWAHS Characterisation Framework for Mobile Work

14:15

Elisabeth Bayegan

A Knowledge-Based Problem-Oriented Patient Record System


 

15:00

Keynote #2: Henrik Rye

 

 

15:45

Coffee Break

 

 

 

Session 3

Chair: Pavel Petrovic

16:10

Morten Hartmann,

Frode Eskelund,

Pauline C. Haddow,

Julian F. Miller

Evolving Fault Tolerance on an Unreliable Technology Platform

16.35

Raimundas Matulevicius

Darijus Strasunskas

Evaluation Framework for Requirement Engineering Tools

17:00

Diego Federici

A proposal for a model of unsupervised symbolic learning

17:25

Wacek Kusnierczyk,

E. M. Sonnrvik

Learning Yeast Gene Function From Expression Programs And Gene Ontology

 

 

18:15

Banquet Dinner


Abstracts

 

Keynotes

 

Author(s):

Jan Komorowski

Title:

What physics has been to mathematics, biology is to computer science

Abstract:

In my address, I shall elaborate this famous sentence by Stanislav Ulam - the father of Computational Biology.  A reflection over the relationship between these sciences will be illustrated with examples from research in our group.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~janko

 

 

Author(s):

Henrik Rye

Title:

Simulering av utslipp til sjø på norsk sokkel

Abstract:

Eksempler på forskjellige typer utslipp på norsk sokkel og hvordan disse beregnes med simuleringsmodeller vil bli gjennomgått. Dessuten hvordan simuleringsmodellene blir brukt til å arbeide seg frem mot å tilfredsstille målsettingen om "0-utslipp" til sjø på norsk sokkel.
http://www.sintef.no/units/chem/environment/

 

 

 


Session 1

 

Author(s):

Pavel Petrovic

Title:

Evolving a Distributed Arbitration for a Behavior-Based Mobile Robot Controller

Abstract:

The paper describes experiments with a Behavior-Based mobile robot controller design. The behavior arbitration (often referred to as action selection problem) is tackled with a distributed set of finite state automatons (FSA). The architecture of the controller itself is based on parallely executed modules (behaviors) that communicate by sending asynchronous messages.

The behaviors are typically hand-coded or evolved separately. Their well-defined interface specifies the set of input and output messages accepted and generated by the behavior respectively. The role of the FSA arbitrators is the integration of individual behaviors into the distributed controller and translation and filtering of the incoming and outgoing messages for the behavior-specific interfaces. The highly modular, extensible, and flexibile architecture was verified on a real robot built from LEGO(r) robotics kit on a simple task of cargo transport with a hand-coded set of behaviors and arbitrator FSAs. Second part of the work discusses the design of the arbitrator FSAs using an evolutionary algorithm, which uses a robot simulator to determine the fitness of individual arbitrators. http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~petrovic

 

 

Author(s):

Ekaterina Prasolova-Førland, Monica Divitini

Title:

Supporting learning communities with collaborative virtual environments: Different spatial metaphors

Abstract:

In this paper we discuss the usage of Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE) in educational settings. In particular we discuss the role that these systems can play in supporting learning communities. The focus of the paper is on the representation of space that underlies these systems. We present and compare different spatial metaphors presented in the literature and analyze how they support the needs of the learning communities.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~ekaterip

 

 

Author(s):

Håvard D. Jørgensen, John Krogstie, Oddrun P. Ohren

Title:

The Future of CSCW: Scientific Maturity at the Expense of Interdisciplinarity?

Abstract:

CSCW is an interdisciplinary research area where a wide range of problems is studied through a number of different approaches. This paper reports on an assessment of the re-cent development of the field. A taxonomy of different research approaches is presented, distinguishing between experimental work, fieldwork, computer science and engineering. Papers from four different CSCW conferences are categorised according to this taxonomy.

The study shows that scientific papers have significantly increased their volume over the last decade, at the expense of engineering work. Potential problems with this trend are outlined, including less new research problems, less practical focus, and less interdisciplinarity. The existence of these problems is evident in the data presented. Finally, some directions towards increasing the interdisciplinarity of the field are outlined.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~hdj

 

 

Author(s):

Inger Dybdahl Sørby, Line Melby, Øystein Nytrø

Title:

Characterizing Cooperation In The Ward: A Framework For Producing Requirements To Mobile Electronic Healthcare Records

Abstract:

We present a framework for characterizing hospital scenarios involving the patient chart, a binder containing the most recent and essential information about one or several patients in the ward (i.e. laboratory results, information about medications, and plans for further treatment).

The paper-based chart is regarded as simple, efficient, and handy for mobile use by patient-care teams. However, the chart is available in only one physical place at a time, and it needs to be manually synchronized with the electronic healthcare record (EHR). The framework presented in this paper has been developed for use in non-participatory, observational studies performed at the University Hospital of Trondheim. The work is conducted as a part of the MOBEL (MOBile ELectronic patient chart) project at NTNU. MOBEL is an interdisciplinary project that aims to specify a “Mobile Electronic Patient Record unit” (MEPC); an interface to the EHR that supports cooperative, patient-focused work. The MEPC is intended as a health record interface, communication tool, and to enhance cooperation among health care workers. We will use our framework to produce a set of requirements to the MEPC.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~ingerdyb


Session 2

 

Author(s):

Gunnar Tufte

Title:

Evolution of Digital Circuits using Development on a S block Platform

Abstract:

Design of electrical circuits is usually done by designers using methods that have evolved together with the technology it self, as the complexity of the technology have increased by making it possible to make circuits with smaller geometry and then of course increasing the amount of functionality and computation speed. By using higher and higher level of abstraction and leaving more of the low level design to design tools todays designers try to keep up with the possibilities the increased complexity and speed todays technology offers.

How can designers exploit the capacity that technology offers and at the same time be sure that the design is correct? This problem will not disappear when new technology as nanotechnology quantum computing, DNA-computing may be available, the problem will probably be bigger since this new technology will offer us a possibility to make even more complex designs.

Turning to non conventional circuits and architecture as a hardware platform may remove some of the problems using technology and design inspired by traditional design methods. Solutions like cellular automata  inspired designs with only local connections and interactions to form a global behaviour based on local properties may be used. A cellular space can be a computing organism where the global state represents the output. A cellular space solution also give us many new problems like what is an input how to interpret the state(s) of the cellular organism as output. A cellular solution may give us some ekstra advantages that evolution can exploit. By investigating solutions like development in combination evolution on a cellular space we have moved away from todays designs and technology for circuits and then may be able to find evolutionary design solutions also applicable to future technologies.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~gunnart

 

 

Author(s):

Jinghai Rao

Title:

Using Program Synthesis to Facilitate Web Services Composition

Abstract:

This paper proposes a method which combines workflow model and program synthesis method for web services composition. The requests of composite web service can be divided into two categories: process oriented specification and interface oriented specification, which can be fulfilled by workflow and program synthesis method respectively. An infrastructure which allows workflow engine and program synthesizer to work together is also proposed. Since the composition by workflow model has been widely used, the paper emphasizes the use of program synthesis, both in language and in algorithm.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~jinghai

 

 

Author(s):

Carl-Fredrik Sorensen, Alf Inge Wang, Hien Nam Le, Heri Ramampiaro, Mads Nygard,  Reidar Conradi

Title:

The MOWAHS Characterisation Framework for Mobile Work

Abstract:

This paper describes a framework used to characterise mobile work in order to elicit functional and non-functional requirements for a mobile process support system. The framework is a tool for specifying and analysing mobile scenarios in detail, resulting in a characterisation of scenarios. This characterisation will indicate requirements to the software architecture and services the system should provide. In addition, the framework will indicate non-functional requirements like network capacity, network connectivity, security. To show the practical usage of the framework, we have applied the framework to a scenario describing a mobile researcher. As far as we know, there are no similar frameworks.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~carlfrs

 

 

Author(s):

Elisabeth Bayegan

Title:

A Knowledge-Based Problem-Oriented Patient Record System

Abstract:

The concept of a problem-oriented patient record was presented in the late 1960s but has yet to gain wide acceptance. In this paper we suggest a distinction between the concept of problem orientation and the implementation of the concept. We argue that the problem-oriented patient record offers an intuitive and useful way to work with patient information. We show that the concept of problem-oriented patient records facilitates better care of patients by supporting continuity of care, removing redundant and confusing information, and enabling easy overview of and access to its content. We further propose a two-layer framework that has knowledge of its content and use and is able to better utilize information in the record by presenting relevant information to the user at a time when needed. Conceptually, this is done by adding a layer of knowledge to the patient record system: 1) Knowledge about physicians' way of thinking and working, 2) Their corresponding information use and need during patient care, and 3) Tools to determine information relevance in a given situation. Such a knowledge-based system is able to reason with its content and use.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~bayegan


Session 3

 

Author(s):

Morten Hartmann, Frode Eskelund, Pauline C. Haddow, Julian F. Miller

Title:

Evolving Fault Tolerance on an Unreliable Technology Platform

Abstract:

One of the key areas in which evolvable hardware has been shown to excel is in achieving robust analogue and digital electronics. In this paper this domain is investigated further by manipulation of the digital abstraction. Some of the strict requirements of digital gates are relaxed in order to increase the complexity of the functionality available to evolution in order to evolve fault tolerant designs. Results from extrinsic evolution of a 2-by-2 bit multiplier, based on CMOS technology under various noise and fault conditions, illustrate the suitability of the messy gate methodology used herein for evolution of a fault tolerant design.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~mortehar

 

 

Author(s):

Raimundas Matulevicius, Darijus Strasunskas

Title:

Evaluation Framework for Requirement Engineering Tools

Abstract:

This paper presents an evaluation framework for requirements engineering tools (RETs). We provide a list of qualitative requirements to guide the customer in evaluating the appropriateness and features functionality of RET. The proposed evaluation framework also contributes in RET development as a set of features that the modern requirements management tool should possess and covers activities of requirements engineering process, fits to and satisfies well-known standard frameworks. We tested our proposed evaluation framework with eight different commercial requirements management tools.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~raimunda

 

 

Author(s):

Diego Federici

Title:

A proposal for a model of unsupervised symbolic learning

Abstract:

Recursive auto-associative neural networks offer a promising framework to develop internal symbolic representation of environmental structure. Current training techniques focus on the use of different gradient methods and genetic search. These techniques have the advantage to be general, to develop distributed representations and to perform holistic computation. On the other side their generality doesn’t pay in terms of learning speed, accuracy or flexibility. In this paper a temporal learning problem is analyzed with respect to traditional on-line learning approaches. The weaknesses of these paradigms are exposed in order to identify the characteristic of a possible better solution. The results show that gradient methods do not offer a way to identify and correct the actual cause of misclassifications and so are prone to be stuck on local maxima.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~federici

 

 

Author(s):

Wacek Kusnierczyk, E. M. Sonnrvik

Title:

Learning Yeast Gene Function From Expression Programs And Gene Ontology

Abstract:

In this article we examine the possibility of automated prediction of gene function from raw microarray data. The data used comes from yeast gene expression microarray experiments in different environmental conditions. The tool used to build a model and hypothesise the function of genes previously unclassified is based on rough set methodology and implemented in the Rosetta Functional Genomics software. We show that it is possible to obtain significant results, and propose some technical solutions to improve the readability of the results.
http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~waku